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20121008
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the foundation of supply side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a price, you reduce costs across the economy and allow the united states to expand the global share of the ever markets or enterprise and wealthy. that's why supply side economics works. it's not merely by balancing the budget or overcoming debt or one of these accounting gem micks that are often treated as conservative economics. it's opening the horizon to the economy to human creativity. and human creativity always comings as a surprise to us. you can't plan it. if you get k plan it, you wouldn't need it. >> can p mitt romney use the phrase politically supply side economics. i think he could if he says that he's reviving the reagan administration. the book was quoted more by -- president reagan most quoted author. he quotedded the book regularly throughout the administration. and reagan didn't balance the budget. he had actually during the reagan administration there was a trillion dollar enclose in government debt. he was winning the cold war. but the private sector increased the assets by some 17 trillion
proportionally pays more in taxes than he does. he also ignores class war is waged in the united states in his class is doing it. rather remarkable. i want to talk about events in the euro zone, in europe and how that affects the economic crisis here in your visit to mantra god, which is an example perhaps , a successful example of an alternative to the capitalist economic model in spain. >> first a word about warren buffett. derek and i think the contradictory mess of all of this is that play. i'm the one hand yes, there've always been people like him on the side of the wealthy of the big corporations who have a clear understanding that at a certain point it becomes dangerous to keep going in that direction. you cannot keep having a smaller and smaller number of people doing really well in a sea of people who have a harder and harder time. for a while they push it, but don't kill the goose that lays the golden egg in the end. so buffett is not the only one. there's a whole bunch of people like that who say that and have the courage or comfort of the security to say it. remember also the same
. and at that moment there was a big tour or about -- furor aboue something called the congestion tax. it was a political hot potato,mp and it was being imposed onm people to prevent them from driving into london too much. and the american embassy maintained they were not liable because they called it the congestion charge, but they saie it was a tax, and the americans were not supposed to pay it. and so robert tuttle arrived for his presentation of his credentials, and they went through all the formalities, and then they had a little informalo discussion, and she said to him i understand you think the congestion charge is a tax. he said, yes, ma'am, it is a tax. and she said, well, of coursehes it's a tax. and, of course, the head ofrs protocol for the diplomatic corps was turning, you know,or white at the prospect that she would say something so political, but those kind of slips are very unusual. and as far as her or relationships with americanio presidents, she has bonded with them kind of on a personal basis, but not so much -- it doesn't have anything to do with politics, republ
with him, sitting next to him, not having dinner, sitting next to al gore is taxing. it is really unpleasant. we asked him what was going on in the white house and he said 1%. i believe it is higher. but if we step back, we often don't know what is going on. that is the dilemma. i want to talk briefly and then answer questions about her new book that i have done, which is just out, called the price of politics. it is about 3.5 years of negotiations between the obama white house and the republicans in congress and the democrats. how they essentially tried to bring the federal government's financial house to some kind of order. the answer is they failed. we have a federal government whose financial house is in total disorder, total disarray. it is a historic problem. to try to put it in english, we have a trillion dollars of iou outstanding in the world. the negotiations, they agreed to raise what they call the debt ceiling, so the government can borrow a couple more trillion dollars. we are going to run it run out of that borrowing authority january or february of next year. they'r
into hiding, trying to generate demand through tax cuts for 95% of the work force, gigantic checks to states to prevent massive layoffs, aid to victims of the great recession, basic infrastructure projects. then start to look and it has $27 billion worth to computerize our pen and paper health care system so a doctor doesn't kill you with his chicken scratch and writing. it authorizes new high-speed rail network, the biggest transportation initiative since the interstate highways, extended our dishing -- existing high-speed internet networks to underserved communities with imam -- modern twist of the electrification program. and research money, modernize the unemployment insurance would hadn't changed since the new vehicle. it launched a new approaches to preventing homelessness, overseeing government spending, and forecasters agree it stops the terrifying free-fall. gdp was crashing 8.9% in the fourth quarter of 2008. that is a depression. we would have lost the entire canadian economy without putting 2009. it is funny. job losses peaked in january of 2009 right before the stimulus has. tha
it was paid for through gasoline taxes. [applause] thethe st. lawrence seaway connecting the great lakes, opening the great lakes to traffic again had been on the drawing board since the administration of theodore roosevelt and eisenhower -- eisenhower took, assumed the presidency in a time of mccarthyism and incredible communist witchhunt. he did it as he did so many things in the background. it was eisenhower orchestrated the army's response in the army mccarthy hearings. i'm not going to get into a contest but that stunk. and when it was over mccarthy had him vanquished but i think it was the desegregation issue perhaps in which eisenhower most often underestimated. president truman had ordered the army to be desegregated in 1950 but the that the army had not complied. 85% of the army was still segregated when i had to power. ike ordered the military services to desegregate and of course this was a new supreme commander whose words they immediately obeyed. he culminated the segregationists of will service and after brown versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the
the individual mandate was a permissible use of taxing power of congress and not the commerce clause, and thus the law would be upheld. subquestion finally anticipate why, why did roberts do that? and i think there were three main reasons. one is, i think you have to take his opinion at face value. eastham thought it was a legitimate use of the taxing power. i think the second and third part more important. the second and third are that, the second is that john roberts saw health care as many people saw health care, as the third in a trilogy of cases, starting with bush v. gore in 2000, citizens united in 2010, obamacare in 2012 your and that, in those first two cases you had five republicans justices dashing the dreams of democrats in what would seem to many as a very partisan case. as they sat down to vote on health care, it looked like the same thing was going to happen. the five republican nominees were going to trash a democratic dream. roberts recoiled from that ip. roberts has a very keen sense of politics in the larger sense. and he knew and cared deeply that the supreme court not be r
't matter whether it is a tax bill, a spending bill, a supreme court nomination, whatever it is. there is going to be a vote, and every democrat is going to be on one side and every public and will be on the other side. it's like we have two separate congresses. not a united states congress, but a very republican congress and fighting for it advantage in fighting to win the next election. that did not happen by accident. it did not happen by accident. i believe in the free enterprise system and i believe in incentives. they work. we have created a political system in which every incentive is to not cooperate and not compromise and not talk to somebody who has different ideas than your own. and you know, that's great. it's great to be pure on your principal. but we are a nation of 310 million people. and we have all different backgrounds and we have all different life experiences and we have different ideas that we feel strongly about. the way a democracy the size has to work. no matter how deeply you feel about one issue or another, at some point, you have to be able to sit down
pleaded to the same about events occurring in dallas, taxes on november 22nd and in his testimony before the warren commission. he doesn't know what it is but he looks up and in kennedy's car which is two cars that had he sees what he calls in his report not normal movements. the president appears to be tilting to the left. we know now the poignant tragic reason that kennedy was tilting to the left was because although he had been hit by one shot he couldn't fall down because president kennedy had this terribly bad back and he wore a heavy corsets and on days like the dallas day where he knew he was going to have a long hard day, he would rather around his legs and his waist of bandage in a figure reconfiguration to give him extra support. when he was hit by the first shot he goes like this and staff hit by the second shot. youngblood sees not normal movement. the president children and at the same moment he sees an agent in the second car. the secret service car rising to his feet and grabbing his automatic rifle and looking around. he doesn't know for what. we know what youngblood does
on a jury or pay taxes, very comfortable with that. one reason i'm incredibly comfortable with that is that in the 2018 election by think it was, 70 million people didn't vote and 80% of those people were unregistered seÓul registration is one of the biggest barriers to voting. also when we talk about things like purging people from voting rooms and about the provision about what's not being counted and people not being on the rule, a lot of that is directly related to the registration problem. so very comfortable with a voter registration. in terms of the mandatory voting its its local question and i think other countries do have mandatory voting just like the jury service or some people have to serve in the military in the compulsory service. one problem with it is i think we have a culture of liberty here in this country. so if we have mandatory voting i certainly think we would want to have a none of the above option so that people could exercise it. politically though we don't know if it is realistic. i think a lot of people would resist it. as opposed to the need fo
buildings and properties in the city which don't pay taxes but use our services and use our roads, put the stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden they have to bear for being the capital city and some times what the state wants to do doesn't necessarily follow the typical ordnances most businesses and residents have to comply with. city ordinances don't necessarily apply to the state so it can be a fraction point but we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far away from the down side that we have to deal with but the biggest challenge is always jobs and that is true of any community. you have seen what we have to offer. it is a vibrant community and there's a lot going on and a brand-new hospital coming online and brand new courthouse that is a $15 million project and the commerce center down the road that is the major construction. we are going to have a big construction project on the interstate that will make traffic move better and commercial development going on in this city and in the census w
of the taxing power of congress and not the commerce clause and thus the law can be upheld. i think that there were three main reasons. the first was i think you have to take things at face value and that would be a legitimate use of it. the second and third, more importantly, the second and third final, many people saw health care as a third in a trilogy of cases, starting with bush and gore in 2000, and in those first two cases, you have five republican justices gashing dreams of democrats in what seems to many is a very partisan case. it looked like the thinking was going to happen. the five republican nominees were going to trash a democratic dream. roberts recoiled at that idea. roberts has a very keen sense of politics in the larger sense. and he knew and cared deeply that the supreme court not be regarded as simply another branch of congress, where democrats and republicans fight. he wanted the court to be seen, if at all possible, as somewhat elevated from that sort of discourse. it is also is a third reason, worth remembering that republican conservative agenda for the supr
property tax. so that puts a burden on the property taxpayer so that puts a burden on the property taxpayer a commercial honor, when you have such a large volume of government -- or a large number of government buildings in properties in the city, which don't pay taxes, but yet use our services, use fire and police and go for it, use our roads, it is a stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden that the city has to bear or be in the capital city. and of course, sometimes in the state wants to do some thing, it doesn't necessarily follow typical ordinances that most businesses and residents have to comply with state -- you know, city ordinances don't apply to the state. so that can be a friction point on occasion. we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far outweigh some of them i've do we have to do it. the biggest challenge is always jobs and i think that is true of any community. you've been around in the last week. you have to see what we offer. there's a fiber community, lot going on. or going to have a bran
college professors failing the test and had to pay a tax and we had to change that. hundreds had been arrested and jailed. my goal organization the student nonviolent coordinating committee better known as sncc. [applause] thank you. some of you remember. more than a thousand students black-and-white color the students came self and worked. the night of june 1st 1964, 3 young men that i knew, too young white men and one young african-american men went out to investigate the burning of an african-american church. was stopped, arrested, taken to jail and later the same evening they were taken from jail, turned over to the clan where they were beaten, shot and killed. these three young men didn't die in vietnam. they didn't die in the middle east or eastern europe, they didn't die in africa, they died right here in our own country trying to get people to become participants in a space process. [applause] and right now there's an attempt for both democrats and republicans to get the postal service to issue a stamp in honor of these three young men. [applause] so, we had to organize and mo
the tax exemption after all, and so my students were able to bring to that the idea that maybe she was bullied as a girl and we do know from the sources that at the age of 16 when she left home for the first time her household had become very repressive. her brothers were talking about the fact that she was going off and talking to people in other towns, and her father threatened to drown her if she went off to war. so they tried to marry her off and she actually went on her own and fought a marriage contract and she won. she wasn't the fun loving girl. she would go on little pilgrimages to places and again was a little bit odd according to their local people. she went on to separate missions she will to see the captain to try to get him to send her to the home. there was the duke and at that point they had a very mixed kind of interview one of the things she didn't want to give we have to feel the places that we study we are going to all the places that she went, studying them, and trying to get a sense of the kind of journey that she made. she went 11 days through the territory c
taxes. [laughter] [applause] at any rate, the way that we overcame this and the way we have to overcome adversity now and we are facing adverse conditions in the united states, unemployment, i turned 50 years old this year. in my lifetime, i have never seen unemployment like this or people having to look for jobs. i employ a people at my clinic and i bet i get 15 to 20 resumes a week for overqualified people. we are living in adverse conditions and times. on top of that we have all of the debt and everything as corny as it that sounds, teamwork is how we get out of that. the democrats and republicans. how did we get to this point in our country were you either have to be a democrat or a republican? you have to believe all of what these people think, or you have to believe all with these other people think. i can't believe a little bit what you think, now we are the tea party nation. that is our demise. because you can't say, okay well, you can take this guy and what he thinks, and people say, well, what about congress? we might have to have a president that's republican and one that's a
then there is a transition tax so they invest in making loans for the economic activity. you put in place incentives so they are not compensating the excess of risk and you have to repeal citizens united and get politics out of the system. [applause] she actually reports. [laughter] you mentioned that wamu has no friends in washington, d.c.. how do we have our own representatives such as cantwell? >> this is a good question and i've competed some journalists reporting on the stories we reached out on multiple occasions because after wamu collapsed she made a big show coming out saying we are going to leave this investigation into this collapse. we'll go to the guilt what happened, and so she is extremely quiet on everything and didn't do anything for the bookkeeper and is just basically to my knowledge kind of ignored it. as the mick would you think of the aftershocks scenario to the u.s. economy and how will the affect the too big to fail banks and if i read this right, the rest of us. >> the after shock. >> i can speculate on what it is, the lingering depression, the slowdown in asia, and the fact th
or as one might say, the young suckers who are taxed to pay for god standard of benefits for older retired people, but who may not see such benefits for themselves when they are in the same situation. and this is really the problem that is leading to liberalism's fiscal implosion. as mrs. thatcher equipped we are running out of other peoples' money. finally, obama is a child of the '60s. literally. he was born in 1961, to an interracial couple, his father was a ken began socialist, and anticolonialist and -- his mother was a dreamy flower child who eventually earned a doctorate in cultural anthropology her adviser was john due wee's granddaughter. as they say, you can't make this stuff up. [laughter] for obama, the 1960s ran until the early 1980s until success of ronald reagan became clear. as a young man, obama suffered a kind of '60s envy. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community or
different subjects ranging from taxes by my friend steve moore of "the wall street journal" to iran by my friend michael ledeen and this one is about gender policies. >> another new book put out by adi, american enterprise institute is "women's figures." >> this book plays to the "playboy" crowd. >> this is in no strata guide to the economic progress of women in america and i want to talk about the broadside and i think some of the ideas are the same in both of these and that is the first paragraph which is compared with men and women in 21st century america live five years longer, base unemployment rate that is significantly lower, are afforded substantially larger share of high school diplomas bas and m.a. an mazen face lower rates of incarceration, algolism and drug abuse. in other words contrary to what feminists, lobbyists would have congress belief girls and women are doing very well. >> exactly, yes. it is very true that women i think earned about 58% of them may send bas, fewer in jail. their earnings when compared to men in the same job are about the same and what we need our eco
of health care, but you can disagree them on taxes or whatever. this is against them personally and trying to destroy and discredit him personally, the obama hate mission. and it's not just fox news. it's out there because of a couple of people that most americans have never heard of, the famous koch brothers, now famous charles and david koch. and again, we have seen corporate sponsored attacks against president before, particularly, and i outlined to them, franklin delano roosevelt -- by the way, that was the dupont brothers. there were three of them at the time. they actually banded together, put their money together, form something called the liberty league to deny fdr a second term. and then with bill clinton of course was richard miller gates who funded all the investigations and led to paula jones come on and on, the articles in "the american spectator." but nothing compared to the money and the organization that we have seen on the part of charles and david koch, who are the heads of koch industries. they are the third and fourth richest man in america. we know about bill gates and
me as odd because she got the town a tax exemption after all. and so my students were able to bring to that the idea that maybe she was a little bit bullied as a girl and we do know from sources that around the age of 16 when she left home for the first time, her family household had become very regressive. her brothers were tattling on her about the fact that she was going off and talking to people in other towns and her father threatened to drown her if she went off to war. so, they try to marry her off and joan actually went on her own and fought a marriage contract and one. she was not the fun-loving girl. she was more of an average pious. she would go on little pilgrimages to places and again was a little bit odd according to the local people but she got her way. she went on two separate missions if you will, to see the captain to try to get him to center to the heir to the king of france and was only after the third interview with with the duke of lauren and at that point he gave the go-ahead for her. they had a very mixed kind of vendor view because he wanted things that she
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21